MARINKA
Masséus

Stacks Image 4594

UNDER THE SAME SUN

This photo series was created in collaboration with the Josephat Torner Foundation and ‘Stichting Afrikaanse Albino's’ to raise awareness about the circumstances of people with albinism living in Africa, specifically Tanzania.

In Tanzania, when you have albinism, you are thought to be evil. There even is a price on the head of children with albinism since killing a person with albinism is considered to bring good luck. The fears and superstitions surrounding albinism run very deep in Tanzanian society. So deep that many women who give birth to a child with albinism are told to kill the baby at birth. If she refuses, she and the baby will become outcasts.

Many children with albinism are denied the most fundamental of human rights. They are despised and taught that they are evil, that their existence is a curse. They live in constant fear of brutal attacks.

Many of those who have been attacked are young children. In December of 2014, a 4 year-old girl with albinism named Pendo Emmanuelle, was taken from her mother’s arms. Police have yet to find her body. In February 2015, Yohana Bahati, a boy of just 18 months, was taken from his home, his mother’s face slashed with machetes as she tried to protect her son. She narrowly survived. Days later, little Yohana’s body was recovered from a forest, where he was found face down in the mud with his arms and legs hacked off.

Because of killings like this, many children with albinism now live in camps. Rejected by and cut-off from their families, they live separate from society in order to keep them safe. In some of the camps the living circumstances are horrible, with even basic care lacking. And this separation doesn’t solve the problems. It doesn’t help with integration. It doesn’t give them a chance to grow into valued and respected members of society. They are secluded, kept apart, hidden, often mistreated and shamed. That’s why the mission of the Josephat Torner Foundation is social acceptance and inclusion.

Stacks Image 8698
Stacks Image 7663
Stacks Image 8553
Stacks Image 8702
Stacks Image 8561
Stacks Image 8555
Stacks Image 8565

UNDER THE SAME SUN

This photo series was created in collaboration with the Josephat Torner Foundation and ‘Stichting Afrikaanse Albino's’ to raise awareness about the circumstances of people with albinism living in Africa, specifically Tanzania.

In Tanzania, when you have albinism, you are thought to be evil. There even is a price on the head of children with albinism since killing a person with albinism is considered to bring good luck. The fears and superstitions surrounding albinism run very deep in Tanzanian society. So deep that many women who give birth to a child with albinism are told to kill the baby at birth. If she refuses, she and the baby will become outcasts.

Many children with albinism are denied the most fundamental of human rights. They are despised and taught that they are evil, that their existence is a curse. They live in constant fear of brutal attacks.

Many of those who have been attacked are young children. In December of 2014, a 4 year-old girl with albinism named Pendo Emmanuelle, was taken from her mother’s arms. Police have yet to find her body. In February 2015, Yohana Bahati, a boy of just 18 months, was taken from his home, his mother’s face slashed with machetes as she tried to protect her son. She narrowly survived. Days later, little Yohana’s body was recovered from a forest, where he was found face down in the mud with his arms and legs hacked off.

Because of killings like this, many children with albinism now live in camps. Rejected by and cut-off from their families, they live separate from society in order to keep them safe. In some of the camps the living circumstances are horrible, with even basic care lacking. And this separation doesn’t solve the problems. It doesn’t help with integration. It doesn’t give them a chance to grow into valued and respected members of society. They are secluded, kept apart, hidden, often mistreated and shamed. That’s why the mission of the Josephat Torner Foundation is social acceptance and inclusion.

Stacks Image 9100
Stacks Image 9102
Stacks Image 9104
Stacks Image 9106
Stacks Image 9108
Stacks Image 9110
Stacks Image 9112

UNDER THE SAME SUN

This photo series was created in collaboration with the Josephat Torner Foundation and ‘Stichting Afrikaanse Albino's’ to raise awareness about the circumstances of people with albinism living in Africa, specifically Tanzania.

In Tanzania, when you have albinism, you are thought to be evil. There even is a price on the head of children with albinism since killing a person with albinism is considered to bring good luck. The fears and superstitions surrounding albinism run very deep in Tanzanian society. So deep that many women who give birth to a child with albinism are told to kill the baby at birth. If she refuses, she and the baby will become outcasts.

Many children with albinism are denied the most fundamental of human rights. They are despised and taught that they are evil, that their existence is a curse. They live in constant fear of brutal attacks.

Many of those who have been attacked are young children. In December of 2014, a 4 year-old girl with albinism named Pendo Emmanuelle, was taken from her mother’s arms. Police have yet to find her body. In February 2015, Yohana Bahati, a boy of just 18 months, was taken from his home, his mother’s face slashed with machetes as she tried to protect her son. She narrowly survived. Days later, little Yohana’s body was recovered from a forest, where he was found face down in the mud with his arms and legs hacked off.

Because of killings like this, many children with albinism now live in camps. Rejected by and cut-off from their families, they live separate from society in order to keep them safe. In some of the camps the living circumstances are horrible, with even basic care lacking. And this separation doesn’t solve the problems. It doesn’t help with integration. It doesn’t give them a chance to grow into valued and respected members of society. They are secluded, kept apart, hidden, often mistreated and shamed. That’s why the mission of the Josephat Torner Foundation is social acceptance and inclusion.

Stacks Image 9120
Stacks Image 9122
Stacks Image 9124
Stacks Image 9126
Stacks Image 9128
Stacks Image 9130
Stacks Image 9132

Ancient Rythm II | World Indigenous Games, Brazil


At the World Indigenous Games in Brazil, I used long shutter speed to capture the indigenous energy - to paint the athlete’s strength, their speed, their ancient rhythm. The resulting soft images connect us to our roots, to the old drawings in caves dating back to prehistoric times - universal and fundamentally innate to all of us. But, the hazy imagery is also a metaphor for the fact that indigenous people are fading. Everywhere, so-called 'civilization' is closing in on them, stripping them off their land, their food and their way of life.

Their land is being taken, their rights trampled, their way of life is being destroyed and they are being captured and killed. For land, for money, for power, for greed. They are the only humans left on earth who live like our ancestors thousands of years ago. Living off the land, leaving no footprint, in harmony with their environment and with respect to all living things. And they are being annihilated.

I feel that this is one of the most shameful injustices of our times. Future history books will judge the fact that we stood by and did nothing. The indigenous people of the world need our help to protect their way of life and to ensure their lawful claims to their land. But we need them just as much, if not more. Their knowledge of nature, of interconnectedness, of herbal medicine and their ancient wisdom is something we need now more than ever. The joint statement they gave at COP21 in Paris is one of the most powerful and inspirational declarations I ever heard, their wisdom a clear beacon in troubled times. They are our last connection to our roots. To our collective ancient rhythm. We have a fundamental obligation to them - and ourselves - to ensure they do not fade away.

Stacks Image 9146
Stacks Image 9148
Stacks Image 9150
Stacks Image 9152
Stacks Image 9154
Stacks Image 9156
Stacks Image 9158
Stacks Image 9160
Stacks Image 9162
Stacks Image 9164

Ancient Rythm II | World Indigenous Games, Brazil


At the World Indigenous Games in Brazil, I used long shutter speed to capture the indigenous energy - to paint the athlete’s strength, their speed, their ancient rhythm. The resulting soft images connect us to our roots, to the old drawings in caves dating back to prehistoric times - universal and fundamentally innate to all of us. But, the hazy imagery is also a metaphor for the fact that indigenous people are fading. Everywhere, so-called 'civilization' is closing in on them, stripping them off their land, their food and their way of life.

Their land is being taken, their rights trampled, their way of life is being destroyed and they are being captured and killed. For land, for money, for power, for greed. They are the only humans left on earth who live like our ancestors thousands of years ago. Living off the land, leaving no footprint, in harmony with their environment and with respect to all living things. And they are being annihilated.

I feel that this is one of the most shameful injustices of our times. Future history books will judge the fact that we stood by and did nothing. The indigenous people of the world need our help to protect their way of life and to ensure their lawful claims to their land. But we need them just as much, if not more. Their knowledge of nature, of interconnectedness, of herbal medicine and their ancient wisdom is something we need now more than ever. The joint statement they gave at COP21 in Paris is one of the most powerful and inspirational declarations I ever heard, their wisdom a clear beacon in troubled times. They are our last connection to our roots. To our collective ancient rhythm. We have a fundamental obligation to them - and ourselves - to ensure they do not fade away.

Stacks Image 9182
Stacks Image 9184
Stacks Image 9186
Stacks Image 9188
Stacks Image 9190
Stacks Image 9192
Stacks Image 9194
Stacks Image 9196
Stacks Image 9198
Stacks Image 9200

Ancient Rythm II | World Indigenous Games, Brazil

At the World Indigenous Games in Brazil, I used long shutter speed to capture the indigenous energy - to paint the athlete’s strength, their speed, their ancient rhythm. The resulting soft images connect us to our roots, to the old drawings in caves dating back to prehistoric times - universal and fundamentally innate to all of us. But, the hazy imagery is also a metaphor for the fact that indigenous people are fading. Everywhere, so-called 'civilization' is closing in on them, stripping them off their land, their food and their way of life.

Their land is being taken, their rights trampled, their way of life is being destroyed and they are being captured and killed. For land, for money, for power, for greed. They are the only humans left on earth who live like our ancestors thousands of years ago. Living off the land, leaving no footprint, in harmony with their environment and with respect to all living things. And they are being annihilated.

I feel that this is one of the most shameful injustices of our times. Future history books will judge the fact that we stood by and did nothing. The indigenous people of the world need our help to protect their way of life and to ensure their lawful claims to their land. But we need them just as much, if not more. Their knowledge of nature, of interconnectedness, of herbal medicine and their ancient wisdom is something we need now more than ever. The joint statement they gave at COP21 in Paris is one of the most powerful and inspirational declarations I ever heard, their wisdom a clear beacon in troubled times. They are our last connection to our roots. To our collective ancient rhythm. We have a fundamental obligation to them - and ourselves - to ensure they do not fade away.

Stacks Image 9212
Stacks Image 9214
Stacks Image 9216
Stacks Image 9218
Stacks Image 9220
Stacks Image 9222
Stacks Image 9224
Stacks Image 9226
Stacks Image 9228
Stacks Image 9230

Monochrome ISSUE N. 01

READ FOR FREE


Monochrome ISSUE N. 01

GET YOUR PRINT COPY


Stacks Image 6541
Stacks Image 6544
Stacks Image 6547
Stacks Image 6550
Stacks Image 6553