Capturing the life and soul of the streets by Daniel Castonguay

Canadian photographer Daniel Castonguay is a true master of capturing the life and soul of the streets. Living in a busy area, he was naturally driven to street photography, with the goal of chronicling quotidian life and human nature.

Daniel resides in the lively Plateau Mont-Royal district of Montreal, an ideal playground for a street photographer. Dynamic, artistic, cosmopolitan and constantly evolving, this neighborhood is the scene of a hectic daily life where fairs, shows and animations of all kinds take place. The dynamics of a Plateau in permanent motion stimulates his creativity.

In the series "Montréal Intemporel" (Timeless Montreal), he illustrates the daily life of its residents, rain or shine. He considers that through candid images, sometimes amusing or even touching, street photography is the ideal media for seizing precious slices of everyday life.

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Daniel plays the dual role of central character and invisible observer in the play of life. In his words, “Street photography is more than a “picture making“ business. To me it is a continuous theatrical sketch where I take part. This sketch can be brought up almost to the fantasy level.”. He likes the philosophy behind street photography, the quietness in the shooting itself, not waiting for anyone, not thinking, but just looking and walking around with no expectations. Letting the emotion take part of the sketch and connecting with a story that can literally be anything.

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Daniel accentuates the emotion of the moment by adding a poetic touch during the edition of his photographic work. The subject and some elements of the decor are intensified while others are related to reverie. His creations possess a mysterious atmosphere and a unique texture, reminiscent of watercolor paintings.

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Daniel shares with us a profound message: “Street photography helps me to remain grounded and admire how similar we are in all our differences.”

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Daniel Castonguay